Going “Above Your Nerve”: An Interview with Persona Poet Susan J. Erickson

Susan J. Erickson

Reading Bellingham poet Susan Erickson’s poem titled “Confession of Sarah Rosetta Wakeman, also known as Private Lyons Wakeman, 153rd Regiment, New York State Volunteers, Union Army” in the current issue of The Museum of Americana: A Literary Review, I was curious to ask Susan about the whole series of persona poems she’s been working on. I’ve greatly enjoy her poems, several of which have been published in the last couple of years, written in the voices of Frida Kahlo, Emily Dickinson, and Georgia O’Keeffe. As someone also obsessed with persona poems, I asked Susan to describe her project and elaborate on her process. She generously allowed me to share her responses.

Susan, why do you write persona poems–what initially drew you to them?

Maybe for the same reason we like to dress up for Halloween to try on being someone else for a while. Or, perhaps because I am a bit of a snoop and am curious about the how and why of another person’s choices. I noticed I was writing poems about women and after taking a workshop on the persona poem I decided to adopt the form for writing about women.

Sarah Rosetta Wakeman sounds truly fascinating. (Read Susan’s poem about her here.) How did you first encounter her, and what drew you to write your “Confession…” poem in her voice?

The Sarah poem was written in response to a call for poems on the role of women in wars. I discovered that women were in the heat of battle long before they were allowed to join the armed forces. Sarah impersonated a man so she could become a Civil War soldier and wrote letters to her family about the experience. Because I would have lasted two days tops in such a role, I wanted to imagine how Sarah pulled it off for two long years.

How would you describe your book manuscript of persona poems in women’s voices?

There is an Emily Dickinson poem that reads, “If your Nerve, deny you–Go above your Nerve–”  I think of this manuscript as telling the story of women who went above their nerve. I wanted to understand their contributions, pay homage to them and maybe dramatize how each of us can go “Above Nerve” (the working title of the manuscript).

How did you select the women to write about?

Some of them by happenstance. For example, I visited Frank Lloyd Wright’s home Taliesin in Wisconsin and learned about the murder of his mistress Mamah Borthwick Cheney in a fire at the home. So I wrote a pair of poems in the voices of Mamah and Kitty Wright, Frank’s wife, about their reactions when Frank and Mrs. Cheney abandoned their families and sailed to Europe. In another example, because we watch birds I was reading a biography of John James Audubon and became interested in how Lucy Audubon, John’s wife, held the family together while John pursued his ornithological obsessions.

At what point did you realize you had enough persona material for a sustained series, and even a whole book manuscript, in the voices of these women?

I more or less got hooked on writing these poems. In fact, I’m finding it hard to turn off the persona switch. Before long I had a body of work. The challenge is really to decide which poems are strongest and how to put together the women’s voices in a conversation that works for a collection.

In terms of technique, how did you go about creating each woman persona’s voice? Did you do this by borrowing language from texts they wrote, or did your immersion in the imagery of their writings suggest the “sounds” of their voices to you, perhaps? I’m interested in how you zeroed in on the features that make each speaker unique.

I sometimes get overwhelmed with the audacity of thinking I can act as a mouthpiece for another woman. Usually I research a woman’s life (sometimes reading multiple biographies) and work to get a feel for how each woman might react or respond. Most of the poems are based at least partly on actual events in their life–for example, I write about Georgia O’Keeffe making pea soup, a dish she made from produce from her own garden. And, I have Marilyn Monroe imagining her life as menu items at Schrafft’s where she often ate in New York City. In reality, I’m certain Marilyn never made such a comparison. I do use quotes from the woman when they are especially provocative or surprising.

What other links can readers follow to find more of your persona poems online?

“Casa Azul” and “Frida Kahlo Prepares an Altar for Día de los Inocentes “ at 2River View
“Frida and Frankenstein” at Literal Latté
“Mamah Borthwick Cheney Goes Abroad” in Marathon Literary Review
“Before Her Round-the-World Flight Amelia Visits with a Psychic” at The Hamilton Stone Review
“Lucy Audubon Wearies of Coping with Poverty and Her Husband’s Rambling Ways, 1821” and “In New Orleans, The Audubons Sit for Silhouette Cuttings, 1825” at The Museum of Americana

Thank you, Susan, for these illuminating comments about your persona poems. I sincerely hope “Above Nerve” finds a publisher soon so that we can read the entire collection!

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20 comments on “Going “Above Your Nerve”: An Interview with Persona Poet Susan J. Erickson

  1. susanissima says:

    Thank you for sharing the interview Susan J. Erickson and links to her persona poems. What a fascinating way to deal with biography in a poem! Loved them all, but I was particularly drawn to the two Frida poems because, I’m guessing, she is most familiar to me.

    • Susan, yes. I love how Susan E. gets inside Frida’s head and shows us such surprising turns of thought–we thought we “knew” something about Frida Kahlo, but now we “know something even more true…

  2. Peggie Merlin says:

    Loved reading the interview and finding these poems which are charming and touching and full of irony and whimsy. Hooray for the collection. May all of us be inspired to find and “go above” our nerve!

  3. jik says:

    Susan J. Erickson’s poems really seem to get inside the characters she voices and your interview gets inside the poet’s mind. A good combination. Thanks, Jennifer Bullis!

  4. Laurel Leigh says:

    As a writer of your own persona poems, I’m sure it was doubly interesting to interview Susan. Nicely done!

  5. Laurel Leigh says:

    I’ve certainly loved seeing your poems in Clover!

  6. Reblogged this on C.J. Prince Author and commented:
    I am always a bit in awe of Sue Erickson and feel humbled every time I sit at her kitchen table.

  7. […] of Contemporary Persona Poetry which offers some 500 pages of persona poems. I’ve also included a link to a recent interview about my persona poem process that includes links to my poems […]

  8. […] of Contemporary Persona Poetry which offers some 500 pages of persona poems. I’ve also included a link to a recent interview about my persona poem process that includes links to my poems […]

  9. […] of Contemporary Persona Poetry which offers some 500 pages of persona poems. I’ve also included a link to a recent interview about my persona poem process that includes links to my poems […]

  10. […] of Contemporary Persona Poetry which offers some 500 pages of persona poems. I’ve also included a link to a recent interview about my persona poem process that includes links to my poems […]

  11. […] so much inspiration. And I thoroughly enjoyed Erickson’s discussion of Emily Dickinson in this interview (where you can find links to her other persona poems). As much as I like that Lady Macbeth line I […]

  12. […] may remember Susan’s discussion of her persona poems in my interview with her last year. At that time, the manuscript was titled “Above […]

  13. Wow! I am bowled over!

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